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10 Real Profiles of Angel Investors
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10 Real Profiles of Angel Investors

By on Aug 23, 2013 in Project Financing | 0 comments

Article by, Dave Lavinsky – Growthink There are hundreds of thousands of individual or “angel” investors in the United States (and many more throughout the world). This is many, many times greater than the mere 6,000 members of angel investor groups. And here’s the key: the vast majority of these individual investors are what I call “latent angel investors.” That is, they have the interest and ability to make an angel investment. But they don’t actively seek to make angel investments. Basically, you have to find them and pitch them, since they aren’t actively seeking entrepreneurs to fund. And in most cases, they’ve never before invested in a private company. So, who are these “latent angel investors?” The short answer is that they are people with money. I sat down this morning and wrote brief profiles of some the angel investors that have funded some of Growthink’s clients. Here they are (I changed the people’s names for privacy reasons). Roger is a lawyer. Alan is an executive at a large consulting firm. Bill is the COO of the US branch of a multi-national corporation. Allison is a restaurant owner. Randy owns a small consulting firm. Catherine is an executive at a large financial services company. Robert used to run his own business and is now retired. He does some consulting on the side. Victor is from Europe. He attended business school in the United States. He now has business ventures throughout the world including one in the United States. Josh is a super successful entrepreneur in his early thirties. He had a lot of success in his first venture, and continues to launch new companies. Richard is a retired executive from a Fortune 500 company. Here’s some additional info: All but two of these angel investors are between the ages of forty and sixty five. All but three of them live within 20 miles of the companies they funded. And of the three, two live within an hour’s flight or 3 hour drive. The key lesson here is this: potential angel investors are all around you. They are current and retired doctors, lawyers, executives, business owners and otherwise successful people with money (interestingly, none of my current clients have...

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What is a Merchant Cash Advance and How Does it Work for Small Business Funding
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What is a Merchant Cash Advance and How Does it Work for Small Business Funding

By on Aug 12, 2013 in From Find the Capital, Project Financing, Running Your Business | 1 comment

Article by, Brent Virkus – Senior Managing Director of Find the Capital A merchant cash advance is an alternative source of financing for small businesses who can’t get a traditional bank loan. If a business can’t get a bank loan, a merchant case advance is a viable alternative if a business has a cash flow problem and an immediate need for cash. Banks have been tight with their money since the beginning of the credit crisis in late 2007. As time as passed during the recession, credit has just gotten tighter. Recently, the Obama Administration strongly urged both large and small banks to increase their lending to small businesses in order to stimulate the economy and speed up economic...

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Find the Capital’s – 5 Rules for Raising Capital
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Find the Capital’s – 5 Rules for Raising Capital

By on Jul 29, 2013 in From Find the Capital, Project Financing, Running Your Business, Videos | 0 comments

Article by, Brent Virkus – President and CEO TRiTON Capital Advisory We’ve found there are really three main reasons people fail when trying to raise capital: They’ve never done it before and don’t know how… They don’t know what capital groups to show their deal to… They don’t put together the proper package… To help people in need of capital, we’ve put together our 5 Rules for Raising Capital: Don’t just post your deal on the internet – Don’t expect people to search you out. You need to put forth the effort and reach out to them. Contact the right capital providers – Don’t start with the big Institutional shops. Start with the smaller start up funds, Crowdfunding Groups and Family Offices. These are the less knows groups and hence more in need of deal flow. Show your deal – Don’t let an non-disclosure agreement hold up showing someone your deal. If you insist on an NDA, you will be moved to the bottom of the pile. Put together the right package – Make sure to use the “KISS” theory (i.e. Keep it simple stupid). Put together a 60 second pitch on what you are looking for that a 13 year old could understand. Then put together the right package so the capital source can easily sift through your due diligence materials. Hire a third party – If you don’t have the connections and experience yourself, hire someone to raise the capital for you. Following these simple rules will dramatically increase your ability to raise all the capital you...

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How Raising Capital Really Works
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How Raising Capital Really Works

By on Jul 17, 2013 in Project Financing, Running Your Business | 0 comments

Article by, Dave Lavinsky I wish I could just say that if you do X, Y & Z, you’ll magically raise millions of dollars for your venture. But unfortunately, that’s not how raising capital works. One key reason for this is that most sources of money, like banks and institutional equity investors (defined as institutions like venture capital firms, private equity firms and corporations that invest), are essentially professional risk managers. That is, they successfully invest or lend money by managing the risk that the money will be repaid or not. So, your job as the entrepreneur seeking capital is to reduce your investor or lender’s risk. For example, let’s say that two entrepreneurs want to open a new restaurant. Which is the riskier investment? Entrepreneur A has put together a business plan for the new restaurant. Entrepreneur B has also put together a business plan for the restaurant…and he has also put  together the menu, secured a deal for leasing space, received a detailed contract with a design/build firm, signed an employment agreement with the head chef, etc. Clearly investing in Entrepreneur B is less risky, because Entrepreneur B has already has already accomplished some of his “risk mitigating milestones.” Establishing Your Risk Mitigating Milestones A “risk mitigating milestone” is an event that when completed, makes your company more likely to succeed. For example, for a restaurant, some of the “risk mitigating milestones” would include: Finding the location Getting the permits and licenses Building out the restaurant Hiring and training the staff Opening the restaurant Reaching $20,000 in monthly sales Reaching $50,000 in monthly sales As you can see, each time the restaurant achieves a milestone, the risk to the investor or lender decreases significantly. There are fewer things that can go wrong. And by the time the business   reaches its last milestone, it has virtually no risk of failure. To give you another example, for a new software company the risk mitigating milestones might be: Designing a prototype Getting successful beta testing results Getting the product to a point where it is market-ready Getting customers to purchase the product Securing distribution partnerships Reaching monthly revenue milestones The key point when it comes to raising money is this: you...

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How to Find Non-Recourse Debt
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How to Find Non-Recourse Debt

By on Jul 3, 2013 in From Find the Capital, Personal Investing, Project Financing, Videos | 0 comments

Gain Access to the World’s First and Only Investor Database of the Most Active CMBS Lenders Focused 100% on Real Estate! Just $97 (Limited to the First 1,000 Subsribers) [divider_bar]Insert Your Text Here[/divider_bar] Dear Entrepreneur, I’m Lisa Virkus, Founder and CEO of Find the Capital. We give entrepreneurs the tools and resources they need to grow their business. One of the most important areas we help our followers with is finding capital for their real estate projects. With interest rates at historical lows and headed higher, there has never been a better time to refinance your existing debt or put new debt on your commercial real estate. When doing so the most important thing to do is make sure that debt is “non-recourse”. In other words, does not require you to sign a personal guarantee. Don’t let one bad deal destroy your entire net worth like a lot of people did during the last economic downturn. One of the best ways to find “non-recourse” debt is through the CMBS market. The issue? A lot of us have no idea how to find CMBS lenders. Furthermore, if you do know who a CMBS lender is, you have no idea how to contact them. So find the capital has done it for you. We’ve scoured the market for the most active CMBS lenders and have created the first and only Most Active CMBS Lender Database. Here are just a few of the most active CMBS lenders that hit the database:             The best thing about Find the Capital’s Most Active CMBS Lender Database, is not only have we identified who the most active lenders are, but…. [red_tick_list width=”100%”] What size deals they will consider Types of real estate they will lend on Geographical locations they will consider Who to call within the organization to present your deal Their direct phone number Their direct email address Corporate website [/red_tick_list] Yes, we’ve done it all for you so you can easily and quickly figure out who is the best group for your deal and who to call! We invite you to take advantage of the first and only Most Active CMBS Lenders Database by clicking the Download button below: Just $97 (Limited...

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Crowd Funding for Real Estate Moguls
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Crowd Funding for Real Estate Moguls

By on Jun 28, 2013 in Personal Investing, Project Financing | 0 comments

Article by, Reuven Cohen, Contributor The market for crowd funding is hot. Thanks in part to the JOBS Act; recent U.S. government legislation that allows for a wider pool of small investors with fewer restrictions combined with the success of companies like Kickstarter. A variety of industry specific crowd funding startups are emerging to take advantage of the opportunities for community organized fund raising. By far the largest player in the crowd funding space is Kickstarter. Since its launch in 2009, more than two million people have pledged greater than $300 million to projects by individual groups of creators. Kickstarter specifically focuses on “creative projects” from the worlds of music, film, art, technology, design, games, fashion, food, and publishing. A prime example is Pebble, an infinitely customizable e-paper watch that has raised more then $10 million using Kickstarter’s crowd funding marketplace. Unlike Kickstarter that focuses solely on creative projects, a new group of up-start companies are attempting to fill the void in funding opportunities within niche market segments. FundersClub allows accredited investors to make early stage investments in curated startups recently raised a $6 million VC round. Another is CircleUp, which is tackling crowd funding for retail companies has recently raised $1.5 million in their angel round and claims to have funded five food companies to date. Yet another emerging sector for crowd funders is that of commercial real estate with several companies attempting to fill the void. I recently had the chance to catch-up with the Jilliene HelmanFounder and CEO of Seattle based RealtyMogul.com. She describes the service as “insider access to pre-vetted real estate investments.” The concept of Realty Mogul is fairly straightforward. Users of the service pool money with like-minded investors to make commercial real estate investments that are otherwise difficult to access. Investors can invest as little as $5,000 for a slice of an investment. Each real estate investment is tied to a real estate company that deals with the hassles of “toilets, tenants and trash.” Helman notes that a lot of the investments are in the so-called “rehabilitation” of real estate properties. Anyone who’s ever watched one of the fix-and-flip “reality” TV shows will recognize the concept. Essentially Realty Mogul provides the ability to bring together investors who are interested in short term real estate investments without...

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