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5 Benefits to Using a Mortgage Broker
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5 Benefits to Using a Mortgage Broker

By on Dec 19, 2013 in Project Financing | 0 comments

5 Benefits to Using a Mortgage Broker Article by John Csaszar of Global Capital Funding Group Are you thinking about buying a new commercial property, multi-family property or looking to refinance your existing loan? Have you started exploring your financing options for the project? There are many different types of loans available to select from, but one of the first things you will need to determine is whether you want to work with a Commercial Mortgage Broker or with a bank or a single lender. Here’s a look at some of the benefits associated with working with a Broker rather than a bank. Benefit #1: A Broker Works for You One of the greatest benefits to working with a Commercial Mortgage Broker rather than a bank is the fact that the Broker works for you. When you go to a bank or a lender to secure a mortgage loan, the bank specialist is solely concerned with the interest of the financial institution. The Mortgage Broker, on the other hand, is looking out for your best interest and can provide hundreds of different, creative options for you to use in financing a property. You truly benefit because Mortgage Brokers are not employees of a particular bank or lender, but instead have a working relationship with dozens of these institutions. Benefit #2: Choose from a Wider Variety of Institutions When you go to a bank to inquire about a mortgage loan, the bank specialist is only representing one financial institution. When you work with a Mortgage Broker, he or she works with a wide variety of different institutions. As a result, you have a broader range of loan options to select from. Not only can this help you to get the best rates, but it also increases your chances of obtaining approval even if you have poor credit. Benefit #3:Brokers are Highly Trained When looking for funding, it is vital to secure the best financing available. Every borrower is unique and every lender has its own rules and programs. The difficulty most people have in shopping for their own loan is they don’t know all the right questions to ask. Adding to that difficulty is the fact that most lenders have...

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New Construction Financing is Loosening Up
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New Construction Financing is Loosening Up

By on Oct 31, 2013 in Project Financing | 0 comments

Article by CoStar It looks like  new construction of commercial real estate is really picking up, which means the banks are freeing up new construction financing! This is an interesting article put out by CoStar we thought you would find interesting. Architecture Billings Index Posts Strong Monthly Showing in September A leading indicator of future nonresidential construction spending hit a seven-month high in September, lending weight to construction forecasts calling for a greater-than-expected 17% boost in commercial construction next year. The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) produced by the American Institute of Architects continued to accelerate in September, reaching its highest level since February and second-highest mark of the year. Meanwhile, McGraw Hill Construction’s 2014 Dodge Construction Outlook projects that warehouse and hotel construction will again lead commercial building activity in 2014 as improving market fundamentals and more readily available construction and development lending should fund more commercial development activity next year. The projected 17% gain in commercial construction for 2014 is a slightly faster clip than the 15% gain estimated for this year, although next year’s activity will still be 28% below the 2007 peak measured in terms of dollars. “The bank lending environment is showing improvement in terms of both lending standards and the volume of loans and the improving fiscal posture of states and localities will help to offset some of the negative impact from decreased federal funding,” said Robert Murray, McGraw Hill Construction’s vice president of economic affairs. The ABI, compiled monthly by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), reflects the lead time of about nine to 12 months between design firm billings and hard construction spending. The September ABI score was 54.3, up from 53.8 in August, while the inquiry index for new projects was 58.6, down from the reading of 63 the previous month. The commercial / industrial sectored posted the strongest growth at 57.9, followed by multifamily residential, 55.6; mixed practice, 55.4 and institutional, 50.4. McGraw Hill’s Dodge report predicts that total U.S. construction starts for 2014 will rise 9% to $555.3 billion, higher than the 5% increase to $508 billion previously estimated for 2013. Multifamily housing, accounted for separately from commercial construction in McGraw Hill’s report, will rise 11% in dollars and 9%...

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New Funding Program for Small Businesses
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New Funding Program for Small Businesses

By on Oct 22, 2013 in From Find the Capital, Project Financing | 0 comments

Article by, Brent Virkus of Find the Capital and TRiTON Capital Advisory Find the Capital is known for two distinct things…Our Industry Leading Marketing Matrix System and Supplying our followers with Capital to expand and grow their business. We’ve been getting a lot of questions regarding our Retail Capital Financing program and how it compares to other types of business funding. So we thought we would provide you a simple chart outlining exactly how our Retail Capital Financing compares to other sources of funding:   What Exactly is a Merchant Cash Advance Program? A merchant cash advance is an alternative source of financing for small businesses who can’t get a traditional bank loan. If a business can’t get a bank loan, a merchant case advance is a viable alternative if a business has a cash flow problem and an immediate need for cash. Banks have been tight with their money since the beginning of the credit crisis in late 2007. As time as passed during the recession, credit has just gotten tighter. Recently, the Obama Administration strongly urged both large and small… Click here to read on! Looking for Capital?   Submit Capital...

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What Type of SBA Loan is Right for Me?
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What Type of SBA Loan is Right for Me?

By on Sep 27, 2013 in From Find the Capital, Project Financing, Running Your Business | 0 comments

Article by, Brent Virkus of Find the Capital and TRiTON Capital Advisory Now that the economy seems to be getting better, we are getting a lot of questions from our clients about SBA financing for their small business and real estate investments. In this article, we thought we would give you a quick rundown on exactly what an SBA loan is and how it works. Whether you’re looking to expand your business, purchase or refurbish equipment, take on new real estate or refinance an existing mortgage or agreement, a small business administration (SBA) loan can achieve modified financing in order to help your company grow. An SBA loan has been the answer to many cash-flow issues that otherwise successful businesses have had.  This business loan is guaranteed in part by the U.S. Small Business Administration and can offer certain small business-specific benefits which are not available with other types of loans.  These loans can be used for a wide range of purposes and are often utilized in order to support owner-occupied commercial property, maintain or purchase new equipment, as working capital, for furniture or fixtures, with leasehold improvements, for debt refinancing and for start-up capital. Types of SBA Loans: SBA 7(a) Who is Eligible: SBA provides loans to businesses — not individuals — so the requirements of eligibility are based on aspects of the business, not the owners. As such, the key factors of eligibility are based on what the business does to receive its income, the character of its ownership and where the business operates. SBA generally does not specify what businesses are eligible. Rather, the agency outlines what businesses are not eligible.  However, there are some universally applicable requirements. To be eligible for assistance, businesses must: Operate for profit Be small, as defined by SBA Be engaged in, or propose to do business in, the United States or its possessions Have reasonable invested equity Use alternative financial resources, including personal assets, before seeking financial assistance Be able to demonstrate a need for the loan proceeds Use the funds for a sound business purpose Not be delinquent on any existing debt obligations to the U.S. government Ineligible Businesses A business must be engaged in an activity SBA determines as...

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Joint Venture Equity | Seven things You Must Know When Raising Joint Venture Equity
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Joint Venture Equity | Seven things You Must Know When Raising Joint Venture Equity

By on Sep 18, 2013 in From Find the Capital, Project Financing, Videos | 0 comments

Article by, Brent Virkus of Find the Capital and President and CEO of TRiTON Capital Advisory Look we all know raising joint venture equity is not easy. This is actually a good thing. Because if it were easy, everyone would raise capital and start a business, buy commercial real estate as an investment, etc. Competition would be ferocious. For this article, I’m going to focus on raising joint venture equity for your business. So to better help you with this process I’ve put together the 7 things you must know to raise joint venture equity today.   First…and Most Importantly Have “Thick Skin” When raising joint venture capital, be prepared for a lot of “no’s.” Using my Google example, even when Google was ready for venture capital, the majority of venture capitalist said “no.” When an joint venture capital says “no,” it doesn’t necessarily mean that your venture is not a good one. It simply means that the venture is not a good investment fit for them. You must have “thick skin” and be able to bounce back from lots of “no’s” and persevere. When failing over and over again to create the light bulb, Thomas Edison famously said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” Have the same mentality with investors. That is, think, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 100 investors that aren’t a good fit.”   Second…Make Sure you do a Business Plan and Keep it Current One of the most important things to show in your business plan is what you’ve accomplished in your business to date. And ideally, every month you are accomplishing more. So, be sure to update your plan with this progress.   Third…Always be a Master Marketer of your Deal In raising money, the best company doesn’t always win. Rather, the guy that knows how to best market his opportunity wins. That is, the entrepreneurs that are best able to market their companies to lenders and investors are the ones who raise the money.   Fourth…Understand That Funding Doesn’t Take Place All At Once No matter how great your project or idea is, you are probably not going to get a $20 million check right...

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Self-Directed IRA Investors – Untapped Capital for Your Start-Up
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Self-Directed IRA Investors – Untapped Capital for Your Start-Up

By on Sep 12, 2013 in Personal Investing, Project Financing, Running Your Business | 0 comments

Article by, The Entrust Group When starting a business, you likely want to explore as many avenues for start-up capital as possible.  Banks have tightened their loan policies lately, making that avenue a challenge, and while there are some grants available for small businesses, chances are that the majority of your funds will come from interested investors. Investors can come in many packages, but we’re here to introduce you to the wealth of opportunity presented by self-directed IRA investors. Who are Self-Directed IRA Investors? Self-directed IRA investors are just like any other investors, except that they are using retirement funds to make their investments. Investing with a retirement account brings certain benefits to IRA investors that aren’t available to the standard investor, such as tax-deferred or tax-free earnings. The standard IRA or 401(k) investor will not be able to invest in a start up business because most banks and financial firms to do not offer a platform for these types of investments.  Self-directed IRAs, by definition, allow for alternative investments, such as private equity or real estate, so it is investors that self-directed their retirement funds that will be looking for investment opportunities with entrepreneurs. Can Self-Directed IRA Investors Help Grow Your Business? The simple answer is; yes. Because self-directed IRA investors have the ability to invest in private companies, many are looking for the opportunity to grow their funds alongside a small business. Especially with the tech boom of recent years, it seems everyone wants to be part of the next big start-up. Similarly, you may already know someone who wants to invest in your business, but has been unable to because of a lack of funds. Chances are these people don’t realize there is a huge opportunity available to them by using a portion of their nest egg. With self-directed IRAs, your neighbor or your cousin could be your next big investor! (Note: certain family members and others close to the IRA owner may be considered disqualified for investment purposes.  Please refer to section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code for details about disqualified persons) About the author:  The Entrust Group is a third party administrator of self-directed savings accounts, including IRAs, HSAs, and ESAs. The Entrust...

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